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Thomas Struth, GREAT, Armstrong Hangar 703, Palmdale 2014, chromogenic print, 6' 1 3/4“ × 10' 10”.

Thomas Struth

Galerie Rüdiger Schöttle

Thomas Struth, GREAT, Armstrong Hangar 703, Palmdale 2014, chromogenic print, 6' 1 3/4“ × 10' 10”.

In 1964, Stanley Kubrick penned a letter to writer and futurist Arthur C. Clarke suggesting they join forces to produce “the proverbial ‘really good’ science fiction movie.” A former chairman of the British Interplanetary Society and the author of many books on space travel, Clarke aided Kubrick in recruiting the experts who helped ensure that the resulting film, 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968), would be as technically accurate as possible for a story set more than thirty years in the future. The advances predicted included artificial intelligence, satellite communications, video conferencing, and personal entertainment tablets. But even as Kubrick and Clarke achieved an extraordinary technological precision, they were less accurate when it came to aesthetics; the film’s interiors were highly stylized, with streamlined halls and sleek white walls accented by color-blocked panels of

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