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Yunhee Min, Luminaire Delirium (Equitable Life or soft machine) (detail), 2015, enamel paint on tempered glass, fluorescent lights, mylar; one of twelve panels in aluminum and glass vitrine, overall 37 1/2 × 24 × 26 1/2".

Yunhee Min

Equitable Vitrines

Yunhee Min, Luminaire Delirium (Equitable Life or soft machine) (detail), 2015, enamel paint on tempered glass, fluorescent lights, mylar; one of twelve panels in aluminum and glass vitrine, overall 37 1/2 × 24 × 26 1/2".

One’s initial impression of Yunhee Min’s new work, an intervention of poured paint and fluorescent light onto two long, normally transparent vitrines installed in the lobby of the Equitable Life Building—an iconic if somewhat long-in-the-tooth skyscraper in Koreatown—depended a great deal on how (or when) one first came across it. If the lights happened to be switched off (as they were at regularly timed intervals), Luminaire Delirium (Equitable Life or soft machine), 2015, displayed a milky, matte opacity, obstructing or deflecting one’s view of the vitrines’ interiors with turbulent, tainted whites, shadowed by hints of darker, more vivid colors swimming just behind. But if the cases’ hidden fluorescent tubes were set aglow, those same soured, opaque whites blazed into translucency, revealing brilliant layers of liquid color, and transforming this patch of corporate

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