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View of “Constant,” 2015–16. Foreground: Grote gele sector (Large Yellow Sector), 1967. Background: Entrée du labyrinth (Entrance to the Labyrinth), 1972. Photo: Joaquín Cortés.

Constant

Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía

View of “Constant,” 2015–16. Foreground: Grote gele sector (Large Yellow Sector), 1967. Background: Entrée du labyrinth (Entrance to the Labyrinth), 1972. Photo: Joaquín Cortés.

New Babylon, the interdisciplinary project created by the Dutch artist Constant between 1956 and 1974, remains one of the most singular, ambitious, and self-critical architectural visions to come out of the cultural ferment of the period: a liberatory vision pursued in the form of tabletop models, architectural renderings, films, collages, written descriptions—even paintings, despite his avowed rejection of painting at the time. Constant’s idea was to transform the world into one global, interconnected city characterized by continual migration and spontaneous play. Strategically opposed to the rational measures of postwar reconstruction, New Babylon simultaneously conveys the inherent dangers of realizing such a dream. “Constant: New Babylon,” which will travel to the Gemeentemuseum Den Haag in the Netherlands in May, did not shy away from the paradoxes inherent in such a

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