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Edgar Arceneaux, Chocolate Figures. One., 2016, handmade wooden shovel, chocolate, acrylic on muslin, and mirror on wood panel, wooden frame, 48 × 35 × 4 3/4".

Edgar Arceneaux

Galerie Nathalie Obadia | Rue du Bourg Tibourg

Edgar Arceneaux, Chocolate Figures. One., 2016, handmade wooden shovel, chocolate, acrylic on muslin, and mirror on wood panel, wooden frame, 48 × 35 × 4 3/4".

Drawing from imagery of childhood experience, Edgar Arceneaux’s exhibition “Cockeyed Eddie” may be understood in relation to the educational philosophy encapsulated by what the Germans call Bildung, which concerns the development of the individual through intellectual and moral cultivation. In part a process of reckoning with one’s own culture, Bildung also etymologically connotes picturing and shaping. Such impressions of the visual onto the self were evident in the exhibition title, which refers to the artist’s boyhood affliction with a form of diplopia, or double vision, that the press release said was hereditary in nature and could be traced back through his bloodline. We are told that Arceneaux, who identifies as black, counts among his paternal ancestors Cajun slave owners—Acadian French colonists who settled in Louisiana following their exile from Canada. This backstory

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