reviews

Janet Fish, Windex Bottles, 1971–72, oil on linen, 49 3/4 × 29 3/4". ©Janet Fish/Licensed by VAGA. New York, NY.

Janet Fish

DC Moore Gallery

Janet Fish, Windex Bottles, 1971–72, oil on linen, 49 3/4 × 29 3/4". ©Janet Fish/Licensed by VAGA. New York, NY.

“The light would be through everything and energy through everything,” Janet Fish declared in 1988, and this is indeed what we find in her wondrous works: Light suffuses each of the nineteen still lifes that were on view in this exhibition, all made over the ten-year period between 1968 and 1978, which proved to be formative for the artist. The illumination is rapturous, immersive, mystical: It suffuses the transparent glass jars in Stuffed Peppers, 1970, and penetrates the wrapped transparent plastic in Box of Peaches, 1972. Energized by light, these everyday things are brought to dramatic life.

Physics tells us that light is electro-magnetic radiation to which the eye reacts: Fish’s eye is electrified by it. As her work reminds us, all the colors of the rainbow are latent in pure white light, and her paintings of glasses of water come close to conveying such light—materializing

Sign-in to keep reading

Artforum print subscribers have full access to this article. If you are a subscriber, sign in below.

Not registered for artforum.com? Register here.

SUBSCRIBE NOW for only $50 a year—65% off the newsstand price—and get the print magazine plus full online access to this issue and our archive.*

Order the PRINT EDITION of the April 2016 issue for $17 or the ONLINE EDITION for $5.99.

* This rate applies to U.S. domestic subscriptions.