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View of “Mika Tajima,” 2016. From left: Meridian 7, 2016; Meridian 6, 2016; Furniture Art (Possession Island), 2015; Furniture Art (Annobón), 2015. Photo: Charles Benton.

Mika Tajima

11R

View of “Mika Tajima,” 2016. From left: Meridian 7, 2016; Meridian 6, 2016; Furniture Art (Possession Island), 2015; Furniture Art (Annobón), 2015. Photo: Charles Benton.

If cyberspace is, as novelist William Gibson once described it, a “consensual hallucination experienced daily by billions of legitimate operators,” then Mika Tajima translates the side effects of this collective trip into impractical biotechnical objects. The three series that were on view in the artist’s second exhibition at 11R continued her project of cannibalizing the cool rationalism of modernist design in order to reflect the precariousness of subjects in the networked, performance-driven, and speculative world of late capitalism. In past works, Tajima revealed the ways in which the utopian promise of Herman Miller’s 1968 Action Office disguises its inherently regulatory function; here she turned to the furniture company’s more recent contributions to ergonomics, and to the conditions of immaterial labor that would make their Embody desk chair—from which Tajima borrowed

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