new-york

Andrea Bowers, Trans Liberation: Building a Movement (CeCe McDonald), 2016, ink-jet print, 95 × 57 1/4".

Andrea Bowers

Andrew Kreps Gallery

Andrea Bowers, Trans Liberation: Building a Movement (CeCe McDonald), 2016, ink-jet print, 95 × 57 1/4".

When Hillary Clinton recently described the barriers to racial equality as “intersectional,” the leftist journal Jacobin tweeted a wry salute to whichever Ph.D. student had joined her campaign as a speechwriter. The editors were calling out Clinton’s nod to legal theorist Kimberlé Crenshaw’s influential argument that discriminatory practices structured by differences in race, gender, or class “intersect” and compound one another. More subtly, the tweet posited an intersection of a different sort: an imagined Ph.D.-politico coupling academic jargon with campaign rhetoric. These two valences of intersection were both evident in Andrea Bowers’s “Whose Feminism Is It Anyway?” Thematically, the exhibition focused on how activists bring intersectionality theory into praxis by forming alliances across diverse constituencies. For instance, the video Roundtable Discussion, 2016, documented

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