new-delhi

Asim Waqif, Puzzle for a Future Archaeologist, 2015–16, personal and found objects, polyeurethane foam. Installation view. Photo: Chandan Ahuja.

Asim Waqif

Nature Morte

Asim Waqif, Puzzle for a Future Archaeologist, 2015–16, personal and found objects, polyeurethane foam. Installation view. Photo: Chandan Ahuja.

For those of us who call New Delhi home, dystopia can be a lived rather than imagined condition; societal ills range from constant attacks on civil liberties under the current right-wing Hindu nationalist government to disease-inducing levels of air and water pollution. Many artists respond to this toxic state of affairs through politics—organizing and attending protests, writing petitions and opinion pieces like their fellow citizens. Though their work often engages with political content, these artists rarely employ overt activist methodologies. Particularly among the younger generation, experimentation mainly takes the form of the incorporation of the processes and vocabularies of disciplines such as architecture, science, and philosophy. Asim Waqif typifies this trend. Trained as an architect, and with a devoted interest in ecology and technology, Waqif explores the

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