new-york

Carrie Moyer, The Green Lantern, 2015, acrylic and glitter on canvas, 72 × 60".

Carrie Moyer

DC Moore Gallery

Carrie Moyer, The Green Lantern, 2015, acrylic and glitter on canvas, 72 × 60".

The Hall of Minerals at the American Museum of Natural History in New York is a kind of subterranean romper room: Frayed carpet covers the steps, platforms, and walls of the darkened spaces; geodes and samples of petrified wood are spotlit in circular hollows, open to touch by roaming toddlers; and the minerals are displayed in dusty backlit glass cases. In several vitrines, the specimens have started to crumble under the halogen spots, and a trail of powder has left its trace against the back of the display. The exhibition is mysterious, absorbing, and intimate. Standing before the fourteen new paintings in “Sirens,” Carrie Moyer’s recent solo show at DC Moore, I was transported to this curious place, my favorite at the Museum of Natural History.

Since the early 2000s, Moyer has been making paintings with stains and pours that evoke—as we are often reminded—the work of

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