hamburg

View of “Cordula Ditz,” 2016. Foreground: One Uses Her Beauty for Love! One Uses Her Lure for Blood! (detail), 2016. Background, from left: Mirror, Mirror / Droopy Emoji (Helpless), 2016; Kiss Tomorrow Goodbye (detail), 2016.

Cordula Ditz

GALERIE CONRADI

View of “Cordula Ditz,” 2016. Foreground: One Uses Her Beauty for Love! One Uses Her Lure for Blood! (detail), 2016. Background, from left: Mirror, Mirror / Droopy Emoji (Helpless), 2016; Kiss Tomorrow Goodbye (detail), 2016.

A montage of cinematic anxiety-dream imagery, a visual space composed of B-movie and trashy horror footage, Cordula Ditz’s solo show “Kiss Tomorrow Goodbye” was dominated by a two-channel video installation of the same title, dated 2016, with its large-format projections, one on a wall, the other on a screen set up in the middle of the room. Rather than tracing the arc of an action, the video unfolds in the mode of free association; one focus of Ditz’s selection was on stereotypical images of the artist and of femininity. Isolated from their original contexts but still informed by the specific aesthetic of exploitation films, the clips were deftly woven into an absurd theater of the filmic unconscious.

For Kiss Tomorrow Goodbye, Ditz began with three hundred full-length films, excising scenes the way a sculptor might remove parts of a block, whittling the videos down to twenty,

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