milan

View of “Goshka Macuga,” 2016. Foreground: Goshka Macuga, To the Son of Man Who Ate the Scroll, 2016. Background: Ettore Colla, Giocoliere, nr. 3 (Juggler, nr. 3), 1967–68. Photo: Delfino Sisto Legnani Sudio.

Goshka Macuga

Fondazione Prada | Milan

View of “Goshka Macuga,” 2016. Foreground: Goshka Macuga, To the Son of Man Who Ate the Scroll, 2016. Background: Ettore Colla, Giocoliere, nr. 3 (Juggler, nr. 3), 1967–68. Photo: Delfino Sisto Legnani Sudio.

In Goshka Macuga’s cosmological exhibition “To the Son of Man Who Ate the Scroll,” the artist stages a creation myth of her own invention, presenting her work alongside a wide-ranging selection of that of her artistic predecessors. Yet this story is ambiguous at first. Visible from the windows of the Fondazione Prada’s ground-floor exhibition space is a man carrying out small, mechanical gestures. He is seated on a large, low pedestal at the site where Virgilio Sieni’s Atlante del gesto (Atlas of Gesture), 2015, was recently performed, and where examples of classical sculpture and their copies stood in Anna Anguissola and Salvatore Settis’s 2015 exhibition “Serial Classic.” Macuga plays on the institutional memory of these figures to underscore her exhibition’s dynamics between the body, time, and space.

Upon closer inspection, the viewer realizes that the man in Macuga’s show is

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