new-york

Lauren Seiden, Reflections in a Void, 2016, marble, plastic, water, graphite, 6 × 52 × 52".

Lauren Seiden

Denny Dimin Gallery

Lauren Seiden, Reflections in a Void, 2016, marble, plastic, water, graphite, 6 × 52 × 52".

In the Western tradition, drawing, or the use of line as the primary vehicle for shaping form on a two-dimensional surface, has long been the scaffold on which the more rarified practices of painting, sculpture, and architecture are built. It enjoys the paradoxical privilege of being at the root of all art—and, as Michelangelo pointed out, at the root of all sciences, too—but not necessarily an end in itself. Especially since the 1960s, artists have valorized drawing by reinventing it: Projects as diverse as Sol LeWitt’s wall pieces, Richard Long’s walks, Kara Walker’s cut silhouettes, and Matthew Barney’s films have proposed new uses of line, pushing drawing in new directions.

Another push came in the form of the “Wrap Series,” which artist Lauren Seiden began in 2012. Made of large sheets of stiffened rectangular paper that have been laboriously rubbed with graphite,

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