sao-paulo

Marina Saleme, The Sheltering Sky 1, 2015, lenticular photograph, 39 1/2 × 30 1/4".

Marina Saleme

Galeria Luisa Strina

Marina Saleme, The Sheltering Sky 1, 2015, lenticular photograph, 39 1/2 × 30 1/4".

Brazilian artist Marina Saleme has been making art since the 1980s. Her most recent show, “O céu que nos protégé” (The Sheltering Sky), displayed a selection of nineteen wall-mounted artworks that thoughtfully probe the status of images in contemporary life, particularly their constructed status and impermanent nature. Saleme is known for her slow creative process that sometimes results in works made from layers of paint, photographs, and drawings. In this show—whose title refers to Bernardo Bertolucci’s film of 1990 rather than the 1949 Paul Bowles novel on which it was based—Saleme presented to an oneiric universe of images that seemed to alternate between revealing and concealing from the viewer all the elements that compose them.

At the entrance to the gallery, visitors were greeted by Céu com ganchos (Sky with Hooks), one of four large-scale oil paintings on display

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