new-york

Sherrie Levine, Orange SMEG Refrigerator and Renoir Nudes, 2016, three oil-on-mahogany paintings and one SMEG FAB28UBLR1 ’50s retro-style refrigerator, 70 × 111 × 27 1/2".

Sherrie Levine

David Zwirner | 519 West 19th Street

Sherrie Levine, Orange SMEG Refrigerator and Renoir Nudes, 2016, three oil-on-mahogany paintings and one SMEG FAB28UBLR1 ’50s retro-style refrigerator, 70 × 111 × 27 1/2".

It’s difficult sometimes to know how to engage with new work by an artist like Sherrie Levine, whose very name has come to stand as a kind of marker in the history of art. When one thinks of Levine, one thinks of “appropriation”—I have an image in my mind of a portrait of the tight-lipped woman that Walker Evans shot for the Farm Security Administration or Duchamp’s Fountain done over in bronze. I think of doubling, copying, postmodernism, the death of the author, the birth of the text. I think, in other words, and while I think I often pass over the material reality of her work, and how it might mean.

Levine’s recent exhibition at David Zwirner, however, her first at the gallery, gave one the opportunity to consider the physical facts that constitute her practice—actually, it insisted that one do so—in part because of the strange diversity of items and materials

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