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Thomas Bayrle, Gummibaum, 1993/1994, video, black-and-white, sound, 6 minutes.

Thomas Bayrle

Gavin Brown's enterprise | 620 Greenwich Street

Thomas Bayrle, Gummibaum, 1993/1994, video, black-and-white, sound, 6 minutes.

Thomas Bayrle is part of a generation of German artists who in the 1960s explored the inherent dissonance of postwar culture in a divided nation, fashioning a particular brand of Pop that cast a darker, more ambivalent glance toward the language of mass production and consumption than that of their American peers. Drawing in part on his experience with Jacquard looms while working in a textile factory in the late ’50s, Bayrle took the serial principle to an extreme, developing his signature “superforms,” mosaiclike compositions collaged from a single, miniaturized motif endlessly repeated.

Though never as widely visible as that of his contemporaries Gerhard Richter and Sigmar Polke, Bayrle’s work has become increasingly prominent in recent years, in large part because of the ways in which his approach seems to anticipate a media landscape defined by the multiplication and manipulation

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