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Anna Oppermann, Paradoxical Intentions (To Lie the Blue Down from the Sky) (detail), 1988–92, mixed media. Installation view. Photo: r.e.m./Hans-Georg Gaul.

Anna Oppermann

Galerie Barbara Thumm

Anna Oppermann, Paradoxical Intentions (To Lie the Blue Down from the Sky) (detail), 1988–92, mixed media. Installation view. Photo: r.e.m./Hans-Georg Gaul.

Any one of Anna Oppermann’s “ensembles” is something like a woman-made big bang. Originating in a physical and conceptual nucleus, it expands in space and time. Some could potentially keep evolving into infinity, while others might reach a point of stasis or even shrink. Despite the works’ scale and material heterogeneity, Oppermann expressly avoided the term installation. Paintings, photographs, painted-on photographs, drawings, found images, texts, fragments objects, mirrors—these are the elements of her universes. Some are hot, detailed, dense, and intricate; others are cool, measured, and accessible, welcoming the gaze of the observer and researcher.

The reinstallation of Oppermann’s works allows for a certain degree of flexibility, which keep them from being mere memorials to their original incarnations now that they must be presented without the participation of the

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