new-york

View of “Becky Howland,” 2016. 247365. Photo: MacGregor Harp.

Becky Howland

247365/Moiety

View of “Becky Howland,” 2016. 247365. Photo: MacGregor Harp.

In 1982, in the backyard of the ABC No Rio artists’ space and community center on Manhattan’s Lower East Side—an area for which dilapidated would at the time have been a euphemism—Becky Howland built a sculpture called Brainwash that won neighborhood cachet. Finely described by Richard Flood in Artforum as both “endearingly jerry-built and menacingly apocalyptic,” it was up for a couple of years, and people would stop by to see it every now and then: a blunt-spoken, twenty-foot-long, three-dimensional diagram of the ravages of capital, pollution, the fossil-fuel economy, and more, all very approximately taking the form of that most ancient and distinguished public-sculpture type, the fountain. All of the works in Howland’s recent show at 247365 date from the early to mid-1980s, and some closely resemble parts of Brainwash. Since our picture of the Lower East Side art

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