new-york

Larry Bell, The Aquarium, 1962–63, mirror, glass, paint, silver leaf, 24 × 24 × 8".

Larry Bell

Hauser & Wirth | West 18th Street

Larry Bell, The Aquarium, 1962–63, mirror, glass, paint, silver leaf, 24 × 24 × 8".

To hear Larry Bell tell it, it was all so simple: In the early 1960s, he stopped painting geometric forms on shaped canvases, what he calls “illustrations of volume,” and began to “make the volumes themselves.” This move from painting to scultpure—which is to say, the move from the representation of three dimensions on a two-dimensional surface to the production of those three-dimensional objects—was, he claims, the obvious next step. “From the ’60s,” Bell’s first exhibition at Hauser & Wirth, succinctly presented this transition with three monumental paintings (the stacked squares of the three-part Homage to Baby Judy, 1960, are particularly compelling), two smaller shaped canvases edged with mirrors (the well-known Ghost Box and its stunning untitled double, both 1962), and a few early boxes (including a distinctly unpolished 1959 assemblage with cracked glass and gold

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