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View of “Runo Lagomarsino,” 2016. Foreground: West Is Everywhere You Look, 2016. On wall: Mare nostrum (Our Sea), 2016. Photo: Agostino Osio.

Runo Lagomarsino

Francesca Minini

View of “Runo Lagomarsino,” 2016. Foreground: West Is Everywhere You Look, 2016. On wall: Mare nostrum (Our Sea), 2016. Photo: Agostino Osio.

For his first solo show in Milan, Swedish-Argentinean artist Runo Lagomarsino continued his reflection on the ways in which history—especially histories of migration and colonialism—is inextricably entwined with depictions of space. At the gallery entrance was a blue-and-white enamel welcome sign that read as a warning: DEPORTATION REGIME. The plaque (Deportation Regime, 2015) was elegantly retro, its aesthetic contradicting its harsh message.

The installation that gave the show its title, West Is Everywhere You Look, 2016, comprises nine maps that hung, furled, from the ceiling at various heights and turned slowly on a vertical axis. The space was thus activated by a hypnotic perpetual motion. Because the maps themselves weren’t accessible, the viewer was, in a way, symbolically trapped in a condition of permanent dislocation. But Lagomarsino also unmoored the viewer by

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