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KwieKulik, The Monument Without a Passport (Police), 1978/2016, ink-jet print, 35 3/8 × 25 5/8".

KwieKulik

Zak | Branicka

KwieKulik, The Monument Without a Passport (Police), 1978/2016, ink-jet print, 35 3/8 × 25 5/8".

Mobility—of both people and art—was the primary focus of a recent show of the Polish team KwieKulik, composed of Zofia Kulik and Przemysław Kwiek, who collaborated between 1971 and 1987. Several works in this show, “The Monument Without a Passport,” referred to travel restrictions imposed on the couple by the Polish government. The ban was occasioned by documentation, in a Swedish exhibition catalogue, of works (A Bird of Plaster for Bronze – Malmö, 1974, and Man-dick, 1968–74) by both artists that, like other works for which KwieKulik are well known, found the pair using their official jobs as producers of regime-glorifying hackwork (monumental sculpture, commemorative plaques, banners, etc.) as background for their own performative actions.

The show took its title from a 1978 performance, The Monument Without a Passport (Police), in which Kweik rendered Kulik immobile

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