dublin

Liam Gillick, Neural Mechanisms, 2016, birch plywood, two-pack lacquer–RAL 6018, mirror. Installation view. Photo: Ros Kavanagh.

Liam Gillick

Dublin City Gallery The Hugh Lane

Liam Gillick, Neural Mechanisms, 2016, birch plywood, two-pack lacquer–RAL 6018, mirror. Installation view. Photo: Ros Kavanagh.

Liam Gillick’s art is often emphatically placeless. His most familiar sculptural works merge forms adapted from Minimalism with the faux-cheerful design styles of present-day corporate or commercial meeting areas, from boardrooms to bars. His typically CAD-drawn, RAL-colored, precision-made Plexiglas-and-aluminum structures recall labor or leisure spaces that we might pass through on a daily basis almost anywhere in the world. At the same time, Gillick’s design decisions are frequently informed by progressive art movements from earlier eras (De Stijl, the Bauhaus): varieties of functional, utopian modernism that promised a transformed world. His designs are hybrid and homeless, relating to everywhere and nowhere. Such self-conscious dislocation is nevertheless coupled with an ongoing interest in more specific, situated histories. The changing contexts for art’s production—and

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