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Rosalind Nashashibi, Electrical Gaza, 2015, HD video, color, sound, 17 minutes 53 seconds.

Rosalind Nashashibi

Murray Guy

Rosalind Nashashibi, Electrical Gaza, 2015, HD video, color, sound, 17 minutes 53 seconds.

“To remember, one must imagine,” art historian Georges Didi-Huberman once wrote. Rosalind Nashashibi’s films task the viewer with considering this inescapable problem of memory: The recollection of an event is always corrupted by the mind that calls it forth. She often exaggerates or otherwise lays bare the unreliable mechanisms of imaginative reconstitution, interjecting documentary footage with staged elements (Jack Straw’s Castle, 2009) or restaging scenes of others’ work (The Prisoner, 2008; Carlo’s Vision, 2011). At times, she points up the tainted products of memory; at others, she provides those details that memory elides.

“Two Tribes,” Nashashibi’s second solo exhibition at Murray Guy, felt like something of a double bind. In the first of two rooms was a neat modernist hang comprising ten paintings in gouache on paper or oil on canvas of vaguely biomorphic forms that range

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