new-york

Caitlin Keogh, Repeating Autobiography, 2016, acrylic on canvas, 84 × 63".

Caitlin Keogh

Bortolami Gallery

Caitlin Keogh, Repeating Autobiography, 2016, acrylic on canvas, 84 × 63".

Like that of many painters seeking to replicate the conditions of our hypernetworked moment—its recombinatory and citational visual culture, and the material disconnect between the depths of seemingly infinite information and the flat, hard reality of a screen—Caitlin Keogh’s methodology is something of an ahistorical exquisite corpse. Her work brings to mind a multitude of art-historical references: She appears to pull her sharp but voluptuous line from Jean Cocteau’s fashion illustrations from the 1930s; her dismembered figures from the dolls of Hans Bellmer and Cindy Sherman; and her flat, bold colors from the sign painting of James Rosenquist and John Baldessari. But Keogh seems to owe most to the Chicago Imagists—who brought awkward, seamy humor to a similar admixture of sign painting, commercial illustration, and surrealism—and in particular to painter

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