zurich

View of “David Smith,” 2016. From left: 7 Hours, 1963; Untitled (Chock Full O’Nuts), 1960.

David Smith

Hauser & Wirth | Zurich

View of “David Smith,” 2016. From left: 7 Hours, 1963; Untitled (Chock Full O’Nuts), 1960.

Many photographs of David Smith (1906–1965) show the artist next to his worktable or contemplating a piece in progress in his studio. Such images seem to present an ideal space for the creative process, revealing the formidable simplicity of Smith’s artistic practice. Intently observing the possible structural and semantic compositions of his tools and the shapes and colors of his pieces, Smith created his sculptures the way poets create their verses. His work, intrinsically lyrical, embodies concepts and moods within a totality of metric laws that the artist could choose to follow or not. This exhibition, “Form in Colour,” clearly revealed Smith’s work as a poiesis, an inclusive kind of sculptural practice, reflecting the artist’s “Report on Voltri,” in which he described his creative process as connected to the table on which his materials were laid out. Smith wrote: “A thick

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