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View of “Jeremy Moon: Out of Nowhere,” 2016. From left: No. 3/73, 1973; English Rose, 1967; Out of Nowhere, 1965. PEER. Photo: FXP Photography.

Jeremy Moon

PEER/Large Glass

View of “Jeremy Moon: Out of Nowhere,” 2016. From left: No. 3/73, 1973; English Rose, 1967; Out of Nowhere, 1965. PEER. Photo: FXP Photography.

This two-part exhibition of works by Jeremy Moon, curated by the young, Glasgow-based artist Neil Clements, consisted of working sketches, studies, and archival material at Large Glass, while at PEER four of his paintings were accompanied by a slide show projected within a large sculpture by Clements. Having studied law and then worked briefly in advertising while maintaining an interest in classical ballet, Moon was inspired to turn to art after seeing the now-legendary “Situation” exhibition at the Royal Society of British Artists gallery in 1960. Aside from a few months at the Central School of Arts and Crafts, London, he was largely self-educated. As with many British artists of his generation, his work can be seen as a response to American abstraction—in Moon’s case, to Minimalist painting and in particular that of Frank Stella.

The four shaped canvases at PEER, dating

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