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View of “Ant Farm and LST,” 2016. Center: LST, Ant Farm Media Van v.08 [Time Capsule], 2008–. Inflatable enclosure: LST, ICE⎽9, 2016. Photo: Andrew Romer.

Ant Farm and LST

Pioneer Works

View of “Ant Farm and LST,” 2016. Center: LST, Ant Farm Media Van v.08 [Time Capsule], 2008–. Inflatable enclosure: LST, ICE⎽9, 2016. Photo: Andrew Romer.

One way to think of Ant Farm, the subject of a recent exhibition at Pioneer Works in Brooklyn, is as the art-world equivalent of an underground music act. They were founded in San Francisco in 1968, against the backdrop of psychedelic counterculture. Despite their impressive back catalogue, they are remembered mainly for two smash hits—Cadillac Ranch, 1974, and Media Burn, 1975. And like so many bands, they have recently reunited, with a slightly different lineup. Back in the day, the group had three core members—Chip Lord, Doug Michels, and Curtis Schreier. In 2003, Michels, who had served as Ant Farm’s unofficial spokesman, died tragically while hiking in Australia, and the group reformed as LST in 2007, assuming an acronym that marks the involvement of Lord and Schreier, as well as that of the younger artist and architect Bruce Tomb.

Ant Farm made architecture,

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