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Nicolas Deshayes, Thames Water, 2016, cast iron, hot water, 45 1/2 × 83 3/4 × 3".

Nicolas Deshayes

Modern Art Helmet Row

Nicolas Deshayes, Thames Water, 2016, cast iron, hot water, 45 1/2 × 83 3/4 × 3".

Plumbing is the original, mostly invisible, technological network that connects us. Clean water, delivered through a hidden maze of pipes that pop up in our homes, enables us to live the sanitary, hygienic lives we take for granted and which are requisite for social acceptability in the developed world. For his exhibition of new work—titled “Thames Water,” after the utility company responsible for waste treatment and the distribution network for clean water in Greater London—Nicolas Deshayes presented six sculptures that functioned as radiators. Cast-iron forms mimicking assholes, wiry intestines, and prolapsed stomach muscles hung at the base of the gallery walls, snaking their way around the space. Bulbous at points, as if throbbing with heat, they were connected by galvanized steel pipes through which heated water ran, creating an environment almost too hot to hang

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