london

View of “Philippe Parreno: Anywhen,” 2016, Tate Modern, London. Artsimages/Alamy Live News.

Philippe Parreno

Tate Modern

View of “Philippe Parreno: Anywhen,” 2016, Tate Modern, London. Artsimages/Alamy Live News.

THE ASSUMPTION that the museum is a timeless space of stasis has come under fierce assault in recent years, but few artists have equaled Philippe Parreno’s insistence on reconceptualizing it as a responsive site of process and exploring the exhibition as a durational medium. Nowhere is this more evident than in Anywhen, 2016, the artist’s monumental commission for Tate Modern’s Turbine Hall, the first since the museum’s major expansion last summer.

In its dynamic theatricality, Anywhen might be understood as a figuration of the self-image of the “new Tate,” incarnating the motto emblazoned on the building’s facade, ART CHANGES WE CHANGE. Those acquainted with Parreno’s previous work will recognize a familiar vocabulary: an illuminated marquee and lights flashing in timed sequence, drifting Mylar balloons, the evocative use of sound, and—provided one visits at a felicitous

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