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Sergio Vega, Modernismo Chamánico (Cathedral-Pineapple-Bossa Nova), 2016, digital print on paper, paint, record player, vinyl. Installation view. Photo: Danilo Donzelli.

Sergio Vega

Umberto Di Marino

Sergio Vega, Modernismo Chamánico (Cathedral-Pineapple-Bossa Nova), 2016, digital print on paper, paint, record player, vinyl. Installation view. Photo: Danilo Donzelli.

For his third solo exhibition at Galleria Umberto Di Marino, Sergio Vega created a complex network of incongruous elements that was already suggested by the show’s title: “Shamanic Modernism: Parrots, Bossanova and Architecture.” The gallery was transformed into a unique environmental installation comprised of images, sounds, architecture, and elements of nature. In recent years, Vega—working with ruthless irony—has retraced a particular paradisiacal mythology that emerged during South America’s colonization. Many early European explorers interpreted the book of Genesis to suggest that the region was a manifestation of the Garden of Eden, a thesis corroborated by the extraordinarily lush nature of these balmy zones.

This theory also served as the inspiration for El Paraíso en el Nuevo Mundo (The Paradise of the New World), 1656, written by Antonio de León Pinelo, a Spanish

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