reviews

Frans Krajcberg, Untitled (Bailarinas), n.d., burned wood, natural pigments. Installation view. Photo: Leo Eloy.

the 32nd São Paulo Bienal

Bienal de São Paulo

Frans Krajcberg, Untitled (Bailarinas), n.d., burned wood, natural pigments. Installation view. Photo: Leo Eloy.

INCERTEZA VIVA means “live uncertainty” in Portuguese. As the title for Jochen Volz’s São Paulo Bienal, this phrase positions the show as the latest in a series of recent, loosely like-minded international exhibitions—from Nicolas Bourriaud’s 2014 Taipei Biennial, “The Great Acceleration,” to Okwui Enwezor’s 2015 Venice Biennale, “All The World’s Futures”—that have variously engaged the topics of eschatology and the Anthropocene. Although the most significant art-historical story of the past decade is the market’s supremacy over all aspects of contemporary art, the urge to intellectualize the apocalypse is an important subplot. And it’s quite a problem that, more often than not, this dire topic is made manifest in ways that seamlessly reinforce those networks that are pulling humanity closer to its end.

Fortunately, Volz has spared São Paulo that fate. If judged by a

Sign-in to keep reading

Artforum print subscribers have full access to this article. If you are a subscriber, sign in below.

Not registered for artforum.com? Register here.

SUBSCRIBE NOW for only $50 a year—65% off the newsstand price—and get the print magazine plus full online access to this issue and our archive.*

Order the ONLINE EDITION for $5.99.

* This rate applies to U.S. domestic subscriptions.