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Inji Efflatoun, Untitled, 1942, oil on canvas, 23 5/8 × 31 5/8".

“Art and Liberty: Rupture, War and Surrealism in Egypt (1938–1948)”

Centre Pompidou

Inji Efflatoun, Untitled, 1942, oil on canvas, 23 5/8 × 31 5/8".

THE PROLIFIC EGYPTIAN SURREALIST COLLECTIVE Art and Liberty has been directly inserted into the center of its European counterpart this winter. In Paris, the Pompidou’s “Art and Liberty: Rupture, War and Surrealism in Egypt (1938–1948)” demonstrates the vibrant contemporary interest in Egyptian modernism, paralleling a similarly themed exhibition this past fall at the Palace of Arts in Cairo. Framed in the city of Breton et al., the work drove home the relationship between anticolonialism and antifascism, East and West. (Indeed, the group’s manifesto, with which the show opens, makes a pointed reference to the Nazis’ infamous “Degenerate Art” exhibition.) Railing against state-sponsored art abroad and at home, the group’s political fervor courses through this erudite exhibition, organized by independent curators Sam Bardaouil and Till Fellrath. Its global ideological critique is

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