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Beverly Buchanan, Medicine Woman (detail), ca. 1993, found-object assemblage, 75 × 23 3/4 × 16 1/2". Photo: Chandra Glick.

Beverly Buchanan

Brooklyn Museum

Beverly Buchanan, Medicine Woman (detail), ca. 1993, found-object assemblage, 75 × 23 3/4 × 16 1/2". Photo: Chandra Glick.

BEVERLY BUCHANAN was born in 1940 in North Carolina and created artwork of singular scale, force, and emotion. From her earliest series, for which she responded to the deteriorating urban environments of New York and New Jersey in the 1970s, to her later works, which intertwine with oral history to excavate African American social life in rural communities of the American Southeast, Buchanan undertook a deep, empirically driven study of architecture in visual art. With her work, the artist asked crucial questions: She attempted to see inside architecture and through it, and to reveal it as something organic, human, and reparative. “Beverly Buchanan: Ruins and Rituals,” at the Brooklyn Museum’s Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art, spans Earthworks and site-specific sculptures, photographs and drawings, photocopied books and notebooks, and paintings and mixed-media assemblage;

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