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View of “Camille Blatrix,” 2016. From left: Whast, 2016; Soul, 2016. Photo: John White.

Camille Blatrix

CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Art

View of “Camille Blatrix,” 2016. From left: Whast, 2016; Soul, 2016. Photo: John White.

Camille Blatrix’s equivocal objects seem borne from some familiar future—a yet-to-arrive moment about which we are already inexplicably melancholic. They recall the technological effluences of a bygone era: phone booths, ticket kiosks, radios, speakers, and related apparatuses intended to streamline transmission and transformation. And the works do travel, if only via the ahistorical narratives they drum up in their viewer. A font might recall the logo of a long-obsolete brand from one’s childhood, or a curve the Art Nouveau brooch worn by one’s grandmother. Often Blatrix’s works appear to drip or drag, as though caught inhabiting several instants in their trajectory simultaneously. In a cultural moment that nurtures fixations on the (often violent) ruptures and accelerations of time and space that new technologies might make possible—think of the virtual realities of

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