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Hugh Scott-Douglas, Boomerang, 2016, ink-jet print and resin on canvas, 80 × 53".

Hugh Scott-Douglas

Casey Kaplan

Hugh Scott-Douglas, Boomerang, 2016, ink-jet print and resin on canvas, 80 × 53".

When British artist Rebecca Moss boarded the container ship Hanjin Geneva last summer to begin a “traveling” residency arranged by Access Gallery in Vancouver, she expected to arrive in Shanghai twenty-three days later. But after the craft’s operator, the Seoul-based Hanjin Shipping Company, went bust a mere week into the voyage, Moss ended up in Tokyo instead, the Geneva having been denied access to its intended port amid worries that docking fees would go unpaid. The artist made it onto dry land just a couple of days later than planned, but the crew members of numerous other Hanjin ships weren’t so lucky, remaining adrift while their destinations were renegotiated. While briefly worrisome for Moss, this strange turn of events finally illuminated what was so interesting about her residency, casting light on the vagaries of an extensive but—to most people—invisible system

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