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Nam June Paik, The Rehabilitation of Genghis-Khan, 1993, mixed-media installation with television monitors, video player, neon lights, video (color, silent, 25 minutes 58 seconds), 102 3/8 × 39 3/8 × 86 5/8". From: “Liu Xiaodong, Carsten Nicolai, Nam June Paik.”

Liu Xiaodong, Carsten Nicolai, and Nam June Paik

Chronus Art Center (CAC) | 新时线媒体艺术中心

Nam June Paik, The Rehabilitation of Genghis-Khan, 1993, mixed-media installation with television monitors, video player, neon lights, video (color, silent, 25 minutes 58 seconds), 102 3/8 × 39 3/8 × 86 5/8". From: “Liu Xiaodong, Carsten Nicolai, Nam June Paik.”

Combining datum and sensoria, the neologism in the title “Datumsoria: An Exhibition of Liu Xiaodong, Carsten Nicolai, and Nam June Paik” simultaneously refers to a new sensory space and a creative apparatus opened up by the information age. The three artists might seem an odd combination at first, but the exhibition offered coherent narratives that told an enthralling, thought-provoking, and, in the end, frightening sci-fi story.

Paik’s 1993 video sculpture The Rehabilitation of Genghis-Khan welcomed visitors as they entered CAC’s exhibition space. Without the title, one would not recognize the figure as Genghis Khan at all. Equipped with a diving helmet, a Bohemian shawl, pipe sleeves, and a mechanized body that shares parts with the bike it rides, the cartoonish figure looks more like a funny delivery guy than the leader of the Mongol Empire. The neon tubes and screens inside

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