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View of “Hélio Oiticica: To Organize Delirium,” 2016–17. Photo: Bryan Conley.

Hélio Oiticica

Carnegie Museum of Art

View of “Hélio Oiticica: To Organize Delirium,” 2016–17. Photo: Bryan Conley.

“HÉLIO OITICICA: TO ORGANIZE DELIRIUM” was the first US exhibition in more than two decades to feature the full breadth of the Brazilian artist’s vibrant aesthetic production, from his early experiments with color and geometrically shaped supports—including his “Bólides” (Fireballs), 1963–69, “Núcleos” (Nuclei), 1960–66, and “Parangolés,” 1964–79—to his immersive environments. Among the latter was his seminal Tropicália, 1966–67, in which visitors are invited to physically engage an array of materials, from gravel and sand to poems and a TV set. The survey also marked the artist’s first showing in the US since the devastating 2009 fire at Projeto Hélio Oiticica in Rio, which destroyed much of the artist’s work and archive. More so than any previous team, the show’s curators faced two principal challenges: how to re-create lost or damaged works and how to reactivate them

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