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Jimmy Wright, Anvil #1, 1975, color ink on paper, 10 1/4 × 10 1/4". From the series “New York Underground,” 1973–90.

Jimmy Wright

FIERMAN

Jimmy Wright, Anvil #1, 1975, color ink on paper, 10 1/4 × 10 1/4". From the series “New York Underground,” 1973–90.

Though freshly painted and well lit, David Fierman’s new Lower East Side gallery is something of a hole-in-the-wall—a very tiny, these days rare, unrenovated storefront space that lends itself to intimate and focused shows. Painter Jimmy Wright’s “New York Underground,” a collection of voluptuous, ebullient, and funny works on paper from between 1974 and 1976, felt especially appropriate to the charming, bare-bones venue, as his casually explicit depictions of gay nightlife—cruising, public sex, and socializing in clubs, bathrooms, and bathhouses, speak to a bygone era of downtown subculture. “This is the world of the Weimar Republic,” the artist has said of the post-Stonewall, pre-AIDS moment he represents here. “Too rich visually not to record.”

Nude or shirtless male figures emerge from dark corners in the artist’s Boschian renderings of action at the Anvil, a long-defunct

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