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View of “Kristan Horton and David Armstrong Six,” 2016. From left: Kristan Horton, Tabarium Consumer Radiation Array 004, 2016; David Armstrong Six, Moonshade Walk’r, 2016; Kristan Horton with David Armstrong Six, Tabarium: Consumer Radiation Array 001, 2016; David Armstrong Six, Dwarf Mallow, 2016. Photo: Toni Hafkenscheid.

Kristan Horton and David Armstrong Six

Clint Roenisch

View of “Kristan Horton and David Armstrong Six,” 2016. From left: Kristan Horton, Tabarium Consumer Radiation Array 004, 2016; David Armstrong Six, Moonshade Walk’r, 2016; Kristan Horton with David Armstrong Six, Tabarium: Consumer Radiation Array 001, 2016; David Armstrong Six, Dwarf Mallow, 2016. Photo: Toni Hafkenscheid.

In a world altered to its depths by human consumption, what will endure? Kristan Horton and David Armstrong Six’s two-person show “If by Dull Rhymes” seemed to propose that castoffs from our sinking ship have a salvageable future even if we don’t. Proliferating commodities provided the material conditions and inspiration for works of literally wasteful beauty, whose elegiac yet playful constructions craftily forecast human obsolescence.

Armstrong Six’s delicately colored freestanding assemblages made of plaster, cement, steel, and other materials conjured an undersea garden growing out of ruins. Some took the form of broken columns made of wood and murky Plexiglas, around which other, vaguely creatural forms with botanical titles—Dwarf Mallow and Opuntia X (the latter named for the cactus genus of the prickly pear), for example, both 2016—materialized. The more organic

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