ostend-belgium

Carsten Höller with Måns Månsson, Fara Fara, 2014, two-channel video installation, color, sound, 13 minutes.

Carsten Höller

Mu.ZEE

Carsten Höller with Måns Månsson, Fara Fara, 2014, two-channel video installation, color, sound, 13 minutes.

The Belgian-German artist Carsten Höller is best known for large-scale installations that invite the viewer to participate in or activate them. But his recent exhibition “Videoretrospective with Two Lightmachines” showed another side of his work. The complex and layered show started with Light Wall IV, 2007. LED lamps went rapidly on and off, accompanied by hard stereophonic sounds of clicking, thus evoking a disorienting stroboscopic effect. According to the artist, this disconcerting welcome was intended to put the visitor in a dreamy mood that would allow her to comprehend reality in a different way—but it achieved more of a sense of irritation.

After this false start, the rest of the exhibition seemed to possess a reassuring stillness—although appearances can be deceptive. Fara Fara, 2014, which Höller created with Swedish filmmaker Måns Månsson, was the first immersive

Sign-in to keep reading

Artforum print subscribers have full access to this article. If you are a subscriber, sign in below.

Not registered for artforum.com? Register here.

SUBSCRIBE NOW for only $50 a year—65% off the newsstand price—and get the print magazine plus full online access to this issue and our archive.*

Order the PRINT EDITION of the March 2017 issue for $17 or the ONLINE EDITION for $5.99.

* This rate applies to U.S. domestic subscriptions.