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Elizabeth Murray, For “Flesh Table”, 1986, colored pencil on paper, 7 3/4 × 4 3/4". © The Murray-Holman Family Trust/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Elizabeth Murray

CANADA

Elizabeth Murray, For “Flesh Table”, 1986, colored pencil on paper, 7 3/4 × 4 3/4". © The Murray-Holman Family Trust/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Remembered deeply fondly by those who knew her for her intelligence and warmth, the late Elizabeth Murray, who died in 2007, was also a heroine for many artists, both as a painter who came up in the 1960s and ’70s, when painting seemed increasingly in crisis, and as a woman in a man’s or boy’s world. Growing out of this embattled place, Murray’s work was as brave as it was funny, as determined as it was adventurous and odd. Her presence in today’s art world—hell, today’s world—is greatly missed.

The drawings in this welcome exhibition dated from the 1980s to the early 2000s and ranged from brief sketches through working drawings—ideas and plans for paintings—to finished independent works. According to Roberta Smith, reviewing the show in the New York Times, the curators—the painter Carroll Dunham and the curator and writer Dan Nadel—operated on a

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