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Oliver Payne, Untitled (Replica of Game Boy Damaged in the Gulf War), 2016, Game Boy console, 5 3/4 × 3 1/2 × 1 1/4".

Oliver Payne

Overduin & Co.

Oliver Payne, Untitled (Replica of Game Boy Damaged in the Gulf War), 2016, Game Boy console, 5 3/4 × 3 1/2 × 1 1/4".

A jar of jelly beans, a replica of a charred Game Boy console, a set of inked fingerprints on a plastic sheet—these were some of the items included in Oliver Payne’s exhibition “Seven Objects.” This title, which corresponded to the number of works installed, is a reference to Miller’s Law, which states that, on average, the human mind can account for seven objects in its working memory. George Miller, a pioneer in the field of cognitive psychology, cites multiple examples supporting his theory in his watershed 1955 text “The Magical Number Seven, Plus or Minus Two”: the seven seas, the seven deadly sins, the seven primary colors, the seven wonders of the world—the list goes on. (In fact, it extends well past seven examples.) Although Miller ultimately calls such commonalities coincidental, the sentiment behind the psychologist’s initial suggestion, and indeed one that

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