new-york

View of “Sondra Perry,” 2016. Foreground: Graft and Ash for a Three Monitor Workstation, 2016. Couch: Historic Jamestowne: Share in the Discovery and Take Several Seats, 2016. Background: Resident Evil, 2016. Photo: Jason Mandella.

Sondra Perry

The Kitchen

View of “Sondra Perry,” 2016. Foreground: Graft and Ash for a Three Monitor Workstation, 2016. Couch: Historic Jamestowne: Share in the Discovery and Take Several Seats, 2016. Background: Resident Evil, 2016. Photo: Jason Mandella.

Data, and its attendant devices, ostensibly exist to help us live “better”: Eat cleaner, work harder, exercise more. But who has the ability to “be good” in the first place, and at what cost? Saturated in postproduction blue, Sondra Perry’s first institutional solo exhibition, which was organized by Lumi Tan and titled “Resident Evil,” foregrounded the following paradox: While the law circumscribes the banal, everyday motions of black Americans as evil, law enforcement’s fatal policing has itself become banal, commonplace. As Perry’s montaged videos and interactive, found object installations revealed, consumer technologies both aid and surveil us, while also setting the limit conditions of the human. In the video netherrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr 1.0.3 (all works 2016), installed prior to the main gallery, Microsoft’s “Restart”/“Fatal exception” screen—the

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