reviews

Raúl Zurita, The Sea of Pain, 2016, seawater pool, text on eight canvases. Installation view, Aspinwall House. Raúl Zurita.

the Kochi-Muziris Biennale

Kochi-Muziris Biennale

Raúl Zurita, The Sea of Pain, 2016, seawater pool, text on eight canvases. Installation view, Aspinwall House. Raúl Zurita.

IN HER 2013 ESSAY “Globalism Before Globalization,” critic and curator Nancy Adajania recounts how, in 1968, the first Triennale India was initially misunderstood and rejected by the art community, and later mummified by the retrograde vision of a meddlesome state. She contrasts this star-crossed endeavor with the Delhi Biennale of 2005, which was artist-backed but short-lived because it had no state support at all. As her text rightly suggests, between these extremes lies the model for a potentially successful recurrent exhibition. The Kochi-Muziris Biennale, located in Kerala and now in its third edition, almost achieves that equipoise. It is artist-curated and backed, but its relationship to the state leaves it in a somewhat precarious position. The government provides a third of the budget—essential support, but not enough to obviate the necessity of cobbling together a

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