mexico-city

Fernando Palma Rodríguez, Quetzalcóatl, 2016, mixed media. Installation view. Photo: Omar Luis Olguin.

Fernando Palma Rodríguez

House of Gaga | Mexico City

Fernando Palma Rodríguez, Quetzalcóatl, 2016, mixed media. Installation view. Photo: Omar Luis Olguin.

“We would reach a better understanding of the world,” says Fernando Palma Rodríguez, “if we accepted the indigenous concept of person that does not limit itself to individuals but that is also conferred to nature, animals, and human beings as a whole.” The works that made up Palma Rodríguez’s most recent exhibition, “Totlalhuan, Mictlantecuhtli, Chak-ek, Kan” (Our Land, Lord of the Underworld, Venus, Sky), fuse vision and language in the manner of an ancient codex. In Nahuatl—as opposed to many Western languages—grammatical subjects aren’t central to oral communication. Even the verb to be quickly becomes unnecessary and redundant: Since things and beings already are, there is no need to emphasize their existence. A person’s presence can be conveyed through the combination of different concepts, the immanence of which is frequently untranslatable. With that in mind, our

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