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View of “George Condo,” 2016–17. From left: George Condo, Shadow Personage, 1990; Pablo Picasso, Female Nude (Study for “Les demoiselles d’Avignon”), 1907. Photo: Timo Ohler. © Estate of Pablo Picasso/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

George Condo

Museum Berggruen

View of “George Condo,” 2016–17. From left: George Condo, Shadow Personage, 1990; Pablo Picasso, Female Nude (Study for “Les demoiselles d’Avignon”), 1907. Photo: Timo Ohler. © Estate of Pablo Picasso/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

George Condo. Confrontation” nestled 129 works—paintings, drawings, and sculpture—made by the American painter over the past thirty-eight years amid the Museum Berggruen’s rich modernist holdings: Picasso, Klee, Matisse, and Giacometti, inter alia. At the entrance of all this was The Great Schizoid, 1984. The artist’s surname is blazoned across its mottled gray background, the o’s formed by twin globes: Condo containing multitudes. “Schizoid” makes sense. While himself pivotal to latter-day figurative art, Condo has long presented himself as a jigsaw of apparent influences, from Picasso to Goya to Velázquez to that 1949 Bugs Bunny cartoon where Bugs plays a psychotic opera conductor, a riot of eyes and teeth. But “great”? This show, from an artist who turns sixty this year, was an elective acid test.

At first glance, Condo flunked it. Consider his flanking of The Butcher

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