new-york

Matthew Buckingham, Celeritas, 2009, screen-printed letters on chalkboard enclosed in wooden cabinet, natural light, 27 × 22 × 4". From “January Show.”

“January Show”

Murray Guy

Matthew Buckingham, Celeritas, 2009, screen-printed letters on chalkboard enclosed in wooden cabinet, natural light, 27 × 22 × 4". From “January Show.”

Back in 2008, on what now seems like the cusp of a fleeting golden age, the gossip blog How’s My Dealing? boasted a section devoted to the casualties of for-profit cut-and-thrust. DeathWatch collated advance reports of the closing of various enterprises, and reading it now induces twinges of nostalgia for such outfits as Bellwether, Roebling Hall, and Rivington Arms, as well as for much-missed individuals such as the late, great Daniel Reich. As the depth of feeling attached to the list demonstrates, the role played by commercial galleries is far more than purely financial; their influence over the ways in which art is made, exhibited, disseminated, and received is too complex to pull apart in a brief review. And while all closures, barring the most planned-for and amicable, are attended by a certain amount of disruption and disappointment, some also leave an intellectual and

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