new-delhi

Jitish Kallat, Epilogue, 2011, 753 ink-jet prints on paper, each 12 1/2 × 15 1/2". Installation view, 2017. Photo: Randhir Singh.

Jitish Kallat

National Gallery of Modern Art | New Delhi

Jitish Kallat, Epilogue, 2011, 753 ink-jet prints on paper, each 12 1/2 × 15 1/2". Installation view, 2017. Photo: Randhir Singh.

IN JITISH KALLAT’S illusory world, a roti mimics the moon. This interplay between the earthly and the celestial, the material and the spiritual, was a recurring motif in his midcareer retrospective, “Here After Here.” On entering the new wing of the National Gallery of Modern Art, the visitor was confronted by a corridor flanked on both sides by row upon row of densely arranged prints; from afar, these images appeared to depict the moon’s waxing and waning. Closer examination of the work, Epilogue, 2011, revealed pieces of flatbread masquerading as the heavenly body, with more than twenty-two thousand “moons” correlating to the moons present in the night sky over the course of Kallat’s father’s lifetime. This deeply personal tribute to a parent who passed away at the age of sixty-two is also a testament to the artist’s abiding preoccupation with timescales and transience.

Roti

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