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Vera Molnar, Carambolage rouge (Red Pileup), 2016, acrylic on canvas, 31 1/2 × 31 1/2".

Vera Molnar

DAM GALLERY

Vera Molnar, Carambolage rouge (Red Pileup), 2016, acrylic on canvas, 31 1/2 × 31 1/2".

“My computer-aided procedure is simply a systematization of [an artist’s] traditional approach,” Vera Molnar wrote about her algorithm-based pen-plotter drawings in 1975. In 1960, the Hungarian-born, Paris-based artist cofounded the Groupe de Recherche d’Art Visuel (GRAV) with Julio Le Parc, François Morellet, and others; their idea was to rethink the relation between object and beholder by means of kinetic-aesthetic experiments. Molnar was given access to a computer at the Bull Information Systems research center in Paris in 1968, and the new technology seemed to be the key to solving a long-standing problem: It allowed the artist to automate her procedure of generating series of works by modifying selected parameters and balancing formal rigor with flights of aleatoric fancy.

Molnar’s recent exhibition “Spielerisch, Minimal” (Playful, Minimal) presented new paintings as well as

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