reviews

Yoshua Okón, Miasma, 2016, eight ink-jet prints mounted on MDF. Installation view. Photo: Ramiro Cháves.

Yoshua Okón

Parque Galeria

Yoshua Okón, Miasma, 2016, eight ink-jet prints mounted on MDF. Installation view. Photo: Ramiro Cháves.

As the title indicates, Yoshua Okón’s exhibition “Miasma” deals with a sticky and disagreeable subject matter: CIA interventions in Mexico. But the political subject matter is handled from an oblique perspective, inviting viewers to fill in the blanks or question what they are seeing. In fact, without reading the exhibition text, one might never have noticed the connection between the work on view and the CIA’s activities in Mexico. It was clear, though, that the United States was a preoccupation of the artist’s: The first thing one saw on entering the gallery was an unframed photograph of a bronze statue of George H. W. Bush surrounded by people riding Segways (all works titled Miasma and dated 2016). The pieces of the puzzle came together slowly in the gallery’s first room, littered with photo-sculpture pieces, clustered together like the rubble of a nationalist discourse. These

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