london

Robert Rauschenberg, Charlene, 1954, oil, charcoal, printed reproductions, newspaper, wood, plastic mirror, men’s undershirt, umbrella, lace, ribbons, fabrics, and metal on Homasote mounted on wood, with electric light, 89 × 112 × 3 1/2". © Robert Rauschenberg Foundation.

Robert Rauschenberg

Tate Modern

Robert Rauschenberg, Charlene, 1954, oil, charcoal, printed reproductions, newspaper, wood, plastic mirror, men’s undershirt, umbrella, lace, ribbons, fabrics, and metal on Homasote mounted on wood, with electric light, 89 × 112 × 3 1/2". © Robert Rauschenberg Foundation.

ROBERT RAUSCHENBERG'S multifarious art was driven by a restless, self-critical inventiveness that he sustained across an uncommonly long and productive career. This full retrospective at Tate Modern, curated by Achim Borchardt-Hume and Leah Dickerman and covering all six decades of the artist’s practice, came nine years after the artist’s death and nearly forty years since his last major show in the UK, a surprisingly extended absence for such a canonical figure. The exhibition therefore stood as both a rare opportunity to see the full range of Rauschenberg’s work for the first time in this country and a major curatorial statement on his practice.

This was, more or less, a conventional monographic show, and was thus subject to the well-understood risk of the format—namely, its implicit bias toward emphasizing isolated artistic exceptionality. Yet the curators made a sustained

Sign-in to keep reading

Artforum print subscribers have full access to this article. If you are a subscriber, sign in below.

Not registered for artforum.com? Register here.

SUBSCRIBE NOW for only $50 a year—65% off the newsstand price—and get the print magazine plus full online access to this issue and our archive.*

Order the PRINT EDITION of the Summer 2017 issue for $17 or the ONLINE EDITION for $5.99.

* This rate applies to U.S. domestic subscriptions.